Short review: Anderson, J. R., Matessa, M. & Douglass, S. (1995). The ACT-R theory and visual attention. In Proceedings of the Seventeenth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society (pp. 61-65). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates

Text:

Anderson, J. R., Matessa, M. & Douglass, S. (1995. The ACT-R Theory of and visual attansion. Proceedings of the Seventeenth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society (pp. 61-65). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates

Abstract:

The article shows how the ACT-R system, which is a general system for modeling a wide range of higher level cognitive processes, has been extended to include a theory of visual attention (synthesis of the spotlight metaphor of Posner, feature synthesis model of Treisman and attentional model of Wolfe). Production rules can direct the attention to primitive visual features in the visual array. When attention is focused on a region, features in that region can be synthetised into declarative chunks. Assuming a time to switch attention of about 200 msec., this model proves capable of simulating the results from a number of the basic studies of visual attention. The ACT-R model  has been extended  to complex problem solving like equitation solving where we have shown that an important component of learning is acquiring efficient strategies for scanning the problem.

Commentary:

The above paper may seem to be irrelevant for the problem of biological foundations of law. However I strongly believe that the there is no fundamental differences between different kind of choices we make, independently from their complexity and their genesis. I strongly believe there are solid and common basis of any decision making. One of the fields where decision making is made within human architectures is field of visual attention. The problem of decision making and its nature is consequently connected with decision making regularity what is almost a normative problem already.

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